"In our present climate of political uncertainty, Nathaniel Frank’s gripping history of the tenacity and determination of lesbian and gay people will serve as vital inspiration for whatever battles may lie ahead."

Lillian Faderman

LATEST ARTICLES

Chronic pain is surprisingly treatable — when patients focus on the brain

October 15, 2021

Washington Post | Oct. 15, 2021 | One-fifth of American adults — 50 million people — suffer from chronic pain, defined as pain experienced most days or every day during the past six months. Conditions include migraines, sciatica and gastrointestinal disorders, as well as shoulder, knee and elbow pain. Back and neck pain, too, affect up to 85 percent of adults at some point in their lives and are among the most common reasons for doctor and hospital visits. Chronic pain results in more than $500 billion each year in direct health-care and disability costs and lost productivity. Roughly half a million Americans have died over the past two decades after overdosing on opioids, commonly taken in a desperate quest for pain relief.

Listening to Trump Supporters: A Liberal’s Guide

December 8, 2020

MEDIUM | Dec. 8, 2020 | Shortly after the November election, I wrote in a newsletter to (mostly) fellow liberals that we must “stop disdaining our political opponents,” understand what makes them tick, and seek common ground. I was referring not to GOP leaders, who should be held accountable for their odious complicity with Trump, but to the 74 million Trump voters who have a wide range of reasons for their votes.

Pete Buttigieg’s coded language shows the limits and promise of LGBTQ progress

March 16, 2020

The Conversation | March 16, 2020 | According to family lore, my father suspected I was gay when I was six because I liked cars with windshield wipers in the rear. (As a shrink, he’s always had a penchant for looking under the hood, so to speak.) There were other clues too. I used to prance around the yard flitting my wrists and waving my arms, chirping in a high-pitched, affected manner: “I’m a boy!” My father would gently take me aside, crinkle his nose and shake his head, saying, “Try not to do that thing with your wrists.” At other times he asked if my flamboyant declarations that I was a boy reflected some worry that I actually wasn’t.